Information Changes, Blogging is Stationary

Spinning top from Inception... what what! šŸ˜€

As opposed to when I first read Andrew Sullivan’s article on “Why I Blog” I have recently started to see blogging as a more of a legitimate writing form. I’ve never been much of a diary-keeper, much less of a blogger. It always seemed rather irrational to me to keep written thoughts when I already had memories Ā in my mind. What seemed even more illogical was the idea of putting my personal opinions on a webpage, for people to read at their leisure and comment on. Don’t get me wrong, I love receiving feedback on my writing. However, what puzzles me more is the reasons behind blogging. During the beginning of the class, I questioned the effectiveness of requiring all Writing 200 students to blog regularly for class. However, what I’ve come to realized from the past month of blogging is that what I originallyĀ perceivedĀ to be ever-changing and fickle (blogging, that is), is quite the opposite.

When I heard the word “blog” before, I more or less imagined a righteous crusader ranting about some cause or another. True story. What I imagined it to be was that blogging came naturally to some people, and not so much to others. (Guess which category I believed I fit in?) Being blatant and clear about your opinions was one thing, but what happens when your feeling about a subject change? As it turns out, I have come to agree with Andrew Sullivan about one thing: “You end up writing about yourself, since you are a relatively fixed point in this constant interaction with the ideas and facts of the exterior world.” And that’s how I’ve come to see blogging as stationary, as opposed to the changing world around the blogger itself.

I’ve found that I really enjoy blogging now, and it comes almost naturally to blog every week and respond other classmates’ blogs. While I’m more used to writing under a strict academic format of drafting, editing, re-writing and finalizing thoughts before ever turning them in for homework, I think that a blog itself has its own merits in academia.

Yep.

As I’m beginning to repurpose my essay, I’m thinking about how I want to construct my ethos around my topic of interest. I wanted to re-purpose my essay around the idea of how language acquisition may change the perception and style of a person’s writing. I also thought about how immigration may affect education on writing, as well as my own experiences with ESL classes in grade school. I’m a little lost as to where I should start, but I know one thing: To get some inspiration, I’m rereading my blog posts.

2 thoughts to “Information Changes, Blogging is Stationary”

  1. I liked the point that you made here, “While Iā€™m more used to writing under a strict academic format of drafting, editing, re-writing and finalizing thoughts before ever turning them in for homework, I think that a blog itself has its own merits in academia.” The thing that I really really like about the SWC 200 class is the informality in much of the writing, and outstanding choices that we can have for every project. This choice makes for much more originality and thought than in pieces that cannot be expressed in mediums such as short or long academic papers, journal articles &c.

    Getting you guys to read through my stuff is awesome too. You catch things in my language and make errors known, and when I re-read it, its like “ohhh yeah, that is a really awkward sentence” its been great so far.

    good work
    jen

  2. In terms of being more reflective about the actual relevancy of blogging, you bring attention to an important piece of blogging that initial skeptics like you and me had at the beginning, which is the personality of blogging. Blogging does indeed allow writers to be more in tune with our technique as writer, given that the act of blogging is the only thing that;s constant amidst the changing world of events that we actually blog about.

    Thanks for sharing this perspective. You make the validity of blogging much more clear to me.

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