Learning About Simple Things in a Complex Way

Right now, I don’t want to learn about simple things in a complex way, and most people don’t, as the reading, “The Big Picture” decided. I ┬áthink that there is merit in hiding simple ideas in complex thought, however, I also think I am lazy and have to do other things like think about complex ideas in an oversimplified way (Physiology 201).

Do you think that there is value in obstructing simple concepts? I think so. Take “Street Haunting” by Virginia Woolf. Her prose is complex, marbled with description and difficult language, and the events are so strange that the reader is not really sure if and when they are happening. In analyzing the beautiful prose and the construction of the story, a reader can find simple concepts. Cheezy as it is, someone could effectively argue, “it’s about the journey” or “experiences are better than material possessions,” etc. But if Virginia Woolf just wrote those things on a poster and attached a sunrise or other picture that always seems to be on inspirational posters, her work would no longer be beautiful (in my opinion). The beauty of her work, I think, is the covering up of simple concepts with beautiful language and a story, and making the concepts available to the reader only if they wish to see them.

I admire and enjoy simple concepts explained well in complicated ways, but I don’t want to have to see any of that sort of writing right now.

Thoughts?

2 thoughts to “Learning About Simple Things in a Complex Way”

  1. I think you hit the nail on the head fairly well here. I’m with you; I have no issues with simple concepts explained in complicated ways as long as there is a point, an urging for the reader to experience a “journey” or something. But I don’t think I want people to start doing it just for the sake of doing it.

  2. I often find it a challenge to decipher simple issues that are made overly complex. I like the way you portray the beauty of Virgina Woolf’s work as in the way concepts are only available to the reader if he or she wishes to see them. It’s something to consider when reading different texts – makes me want to think of the readings in a new light.

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