Language = Evolutionary

While working on my Capstone project proposal, I stumbled upon a major idea that can be translated into my Writer’s Evolution Essay.

In my original proposal, I compared the evolutionism of the language of comedy films to the evolutionism of my own writing through my three years and many experiences in the Sweetland Writing Minor. I thought this would be an interesting way to connect my final project to the progress that I have made throughout the program.

However, this idea of “language evolution” really got me thinking about one of my favorite concepts of linguistics – of course being the changes of both written and spoken American English language throughout the years. We can all agree that our language has changed drastically since the introduction of the internet, social media, and Youtube on our once British-proper spoken society. There has been a lot of debate about whether the internet has changed the English language for better, for worse, or for…both? Consider what how much more difficult it would be to get your point across without the popular and easy acronyms “WTF” and “OMG.”

Words

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You might be wondering: What on earth does this concept have to do with the evolution of my own writing throughout the last three years? Well, in the height of the internet-language era, I have progressed in my writing and even developed my own style of writing. Would this style be the same without the constantly-changing language of the internet? Most likely not.

For my Writer’s evolution Paper, I would like to look at the changes within my own writing throughout the past few years and how these changes connect, if at all, to the changes in internet language. For example, my ability to write-freely on blogs has helped my writing style to become more casual and relatable. I am not sure of exactly how I will make all of these connections into one essay, but I will try!

Here is a piece I found about how the hashtag has singlehandedly “ruined the English language.” I can definitely find a lot more sources where that one came from…

#guilty

http://gizmodo.com/5869538/how-the-hashtag-is-ruining-the-english-language

 

2 thoughts to “Language = Evolutionary”

  1. This is so interesting, and definitely relevant to both your major and your evolution as a writer! I’ve wondered about how blogging has affected my writing, too. I really do think it saved my voice, because after elementary school, pretty much ALL of the writing I was doing in school was academic and stuffy. If it weren’t for blogging, AIM, and playful internet slang I have no idea what my voice would be like on paper.

    I think that’ll be a really interesting angle to take for your writer’s evolution essay! It would be cool to use snippets of blog entries, IMs, or Facebook comments/posts and to examine how that kind of language has intersected with your more in-depth writing. I don’t think internet language is necessarily bad, especially for people like you or me or other writers who don’t use it just to be lazy!

  2. Your post made me chuckle. I like this idea you’re getting at where in an online environment where we’re constantly asked to talk about ourselves (I’m fine, Facebook, thanks for asking) it has really pushed us to define our voices in text. Granted we would never write a paper the way we write a tweet, a status update, or a pinterest caption, but on the other hand that’s given us a lot, and I mean A LOT of practice at conveying our opinions and tonal flavor in a pretty small amount of space. …There’s also the plethora of problems that have risen along with those changes, but here is a positive aspect and I’m sticking to it!

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