A Glimpse of Me

Curiosity.

Fascination.

 

Two traits that are oft-times associated with a child-like wonder of the world.

Two traits that are admired in our society for their correlation with creativity, development, and above all, innovation.

Two traits that, together, have formed my current personality and sense of self.

 

I am first and foremost a lover of our world. While some disparage the cold and biting winter wind for its less than redeeming affiliation with discomfort, I marvel at the harsh power of our world. Because when the frigid wind hits me with just the right propulsion and trajectory, and cuts straight through my parka at just the right angles, our world changes the texture of my skin, gifting me with an infinite collection of goosebumps. It alters my biologically “set-in-stone” body temperature, and handicaps my fingers from completing any of the tasks they were genetically created to complete.

And at that same moment, I feel as though I am flying.

Flying with the momentary freedom of paralysis, preventing me from doing anything but stand, absolutely and completely dumbstruck by our world.

 

I question how we, as mere humans, landed in such a beautiful and incredible place. How the bright spring colors and the monochromatic browns and whites of the winter are cyclically formulated. How the birds capture the power of the air and the fish capture the power of the water. How our world contains an infinite set of creatures and systems, all of which appear in juxtaposition, but are in a harmony more perfect than humans will ever fully understand.

As you may have already ascertained, I have always been one of “those” kids who loves school. I feed off of the voices of my instructors as they transcend knowledge and new ideas into my mind. The acquirement of such information is undoubtedly my inspiration to rise every morning. To me, everyday holds the promise of a slight abatement to my hunger for answers, and an even greater intensification of my thirst for more.

And more.

And more.

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Meridian Line in Greenwich

I am a Mathematics major, a PitE minor, and a Sweetland Writing minor. These three areas of study, while in stark contrast, represent a path towards my greater understanding of our world. While the  ability to see our world’s harmony may seem obviously related to Mathematics and PitE, writing is often a confusing addition.

I approach writing as I would a mathematical problem: I allow my inspiration to take the form of a question, I think deeply and abstractly about the question, and I write to convert the abstract solutions existing in my mind to a concrete form of art.

 

For me then, writing is a key to furthering and deepening the connections I make between our world’s many systems.

For me, my curiosity and fascination are “how” I write. I simply reflect upon what I see, and allow questions and answers to flow.

 

7 thoughts to “A Glimpse of Me”

  1. Hi Madison!

    I want to start off by saying that I think you write very elegantly. Just from your introduction post, I am already excited to workshop your first project in class. You seem to have a great love for our world, as I do myself, with of course much curiosity and fascination. Your writing is so descriptive and I can easily see what you are describing in my head. A lot of times I write, too, by reflecting on what I see and go from there. How will you use the three projects for this course to deepen the connections you make between our world’s systems? I am looking forward to reading more of your writing!

    1. Hey Allyson! I’m not quite sure yet what I want to do for the three projects, but I would like to do something about how people are affected by the happenings in their life/the connections they make with other people around them.

  2. As you mention in your post you love to notice the small things in life and this definitely comes through in your writing. It comes through in part because you say that you notice these things but also because you do such a good job of describing them in your writing. You seem to really enjoy the world and the small things and after reading this post it kind of makes me wish that I had the same thing as I don’t think I could write about the awe of the cold wind for a paragraph. Your connection of math and writing is very interesting and I do think that higher mathematics and writing are a lot more connected than many people think. Overall, I can’t wait to read more about what you find fascinating in the world!

  3. Dang, girl. The way you express yourself is so poetic and, as Ally said, elegant. Let me just sit back and bask in the beauty of how you strung together those words and also how you actually don’t mind the wind chill. For me, nature is something best enjoyed from the indoors, but your enthusiasm and deep love for the world is making me consider changing my ways. Maybe I’ll go to the arb for fun (lol). But, seriously, I really enjoyed your post.
    I’m so excited to read more of your writing!

    (BTW what’s a PitE minor? I feel so out of touch.)

  4. Hey Madison!
    I loved your intro. It was bold. It was clear. It drew me in. Your descriptive language throughout really allowed me to feel what you were describing. I could really relate to when you were talking about being one of those kids who loves school. I was also one of those kids, and for whatever reason, at my school that was not cool. Did you ever get backlash from your peers in school for having a love for learning? I wonder why loving to learn has such a negative connotation… Anyways, can’t wait to get to know you better this semester!

    Your friend,

    Meredith

    1. Hey Meredith! I personally never received backlash from my peers, but that might have been because when I was younger I was very much in my own world haha. In my opinion though, I think it has such a negative connotation because there is an overwhelming competitive aspect to academia nowadays, especially for younger children. Therefore, when kids don’t do well in the areas that society deems important, they feel bad about it. So these kids end up rejecting the whole system and resenting those who do do well (or at least by the societal definition of well).

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