Help with sources

My project explores gender fluidity and what it means to different people. While I am also interested in incorporating anonymity and making connections between it and expression of gender, I am honestly quite lost as to how I should bring it in right now. So my focus is mainly on gender identification that falls beyond the widely accepted binary of male and female. As of now, I am still scouring the library databases for good sources. I’ve found Kate Bornstein who wrote books about her own journey in defying gender norms. I have found a couple more mainstream articles but I’m really not sure if I can even use them anyhow besides using them as a way to gauge the general idea that “the public” has about the topic. So far, I have found a few contacts here at the university that I am looking forward to speaking to about this, but I would love to know if any of you knows someone who has good knowledge and/or experience and who would be willing to discuss this. Also, all recommendations for related readings are completely welcomed. If it helps, I am planning on creating a podcast, a supplemental text, and a photo collage, so I would love to look at works in other media as well.

4 thoughts to “Help with sources”

  1. Hey Krystal,

    I’m hoping my inner (and outer, I suppose) literary criticism and theory nerd can help you out. There’s a really awesome booK that maKes lit theory/crit SUPER accessible and really easy to understand that has helped me a ton, AND is available at the library at the time I’m writing this comment: http://mirlyn.lib.umich.edu/Record/010817666

    For your project, the chapters on structuralism, deconstruction, feminism, and queer theory might prove helpful. I’m not sure any of this will related directly to the ideas you’re exploring about gender, but they might provide a good base for understanding where our current understandings about gender come from? At least, I hope.

    Jeffrey Eugenides also has a really well Known novel, Middlesex, the main protagonist of which is intersex and identifies as different genders at different points in the novel. I’m not sure how much a worK of fiction would help out, but it might be worth a looK?

    I actually have this booK on my shelf that I’ve never read, “How Sex Changed: A History of Transsexuality in the United States.” The booK claims to be a “social, cultural, and medical history of transsexuality” focused on the United States. If it’s something you’d liKe to taKe a looK at, I’d be more than happy to bring it in tomorrow and loan it to you for awhile.

    Hope these help.

    Josh

  2. Thanks, Josh! I will definitely look at the book you recommended. I haven’t been having much luck with my searches on Mirlyn but I think that may be because I’m not quite sure what other key words to try. If you don’t mind, I’d love to read the book you have too!

  3. My main experience with understanding gender norms and gender binary comes from learning from my sister, who is currently in her second year at the School of Social Work. She is learning in one of her classes how to approach and support clients who are dealing with gender issues. If you thought it was worthwhile, I could ask her who her professor is. Maybe it would be helpful to talk to someone who has clinical experience.

    I’m sorry I can’t be of better help. I am really interested to hear about your project as it comes along.

Leave a Reply