Rough Reading in Art History

Arguments usually follow patterns; that is, there are certain

things we typically do and do not do in arguing. The fact

that we in part conceptualize arguments in terms of battle

systematically influences the shape arguments take and the

way we talk about what we do in arguing. Because the

metaphorical concept is systematic, the language we use to

talk about that aspect of the concept is systematic.

We saw in the ARGUMENT IS WAR metaphor that expressions

from the vocabulary of war, e.g., attack a position,

indefensible, strategy, new line of attack, win, gain ground,

etc., form a systematic way of talking about the battling

aspects of arguing. It is no accident that these expressions

mean what they mean when we use them to talk about

arguments. A portion of the conceptual network of battle

partially characterizes the concept of an argument, and the

language follows suit. Since metaphorical expressions in

our language are tied to metaphorical concepts in a systematic

way, we can use metaphorical linguistic expressions to

study the nature of metaphorical concepts and to gain an

understanding of the metaphorical nature of our activities.

Danielle Kramer

I like frozen peas. Sometimes I have a craving to carry a baby in my uterus. I hate running. I prefer to stand while doing my homework. I live in a student housing cooperative. I think everyone should work in costumer service for at least three months. I study art history and international studies. People who don't like chocolate are of another species. Kurt Vonnegut and I would have awesome brain babies. My initials spell DAK. I am an only child. Cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats cats

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