Blogging about Future Blogging

My goal for this repurposing project is to take the question that fueled my original piece, and repurpose it to be more applicable and relatable to an audience of college students. The basic theme underlying my original question: What are the consequences on physical health that result from a culture that encourages supplement use in high school athletes? Now, my question is still related to physical health and well being, but now it is: What are the consequences on physical health of the social and cultural pressures that most college students face?

 

Trying to provide advice to young athletes on where to turn in a society that tends to encourage risky behavior was the goal of the first piece. My purpose remains the same in the second piece, although now my audience is not only athletes, but also the average college student that tries to stay fit in his/her spare time.

 

To accomplish this purpose, I think it would be most effective to do these three things.

  1. Establish the issue or problem that is having an impact on college students’ fitness.
  2. Give my advice on the issue based on research I’ve done as well as personal experience.
  3. Since I don’t know everything, I think it would be great to do a profile on one college student who is succeeding in overcoming the problem at hand, and doing it in a unique way.

 

So, how will I do these three things?

 

First, writing about what is wrong with physical health among college students in a general sense is important to establish—I think a short letter addressed to college students to introduce myself and my position on the topic would be a great way to do this.

 

I want to then do a series of blog posts on the different pressures that college students face that impact their health. In this blog post will be the profile on a student who is conquering this certain issue. I definitely want my blogs to be multimodal, and I’ll be modeling them after examples I’ve seen surfing the Internet. But I also want my blogs to be unique, so I’m trying to figure out ways to publish my blogs in ways that maybe haven’t been done before. Ideas would be much appreciated!!

 

The last piece of my project, to sum all my work up, and put my work in a credible framework, I think a compact, scholarly, scientific type article could work.

 

I know this is ambitious, and it’s a big topic. So many people on the Internet, on social media, and around campus are broadcasting their thoughts on how to stay fit as a college student. Students, myself included, can easily become bogged down in the thousands of ads, social media posts, videos, etc. that are telling them how they should be living their life. The truth is, only you know you, and only you can figure out what’s right for your schedule, and your body. The only thing I want to do with my project is to give someone that little nudge in the right direction. Maybe a nugget of wisdom here, a nugget there. Through my blogs, my goal is to help everyone find even just one piece of advice that they can relate with.

The thing is, how do I make my blog different than the millions already out there?

How do I gain readership in a never-ending virtual world cluttered with the opinion of everyone from MDs to “fitness gurus” to this guy? (really funny stuff, highly recommend) Doing profiles on certain students is one way I thought might help me be a little different, but do you have any ideas for me?

 

That brings us to the content: what content am I actually going to include in my project? So far, while walking to class, lying in bed, taking a shower, pretty much at any random moment of the day, this project will come across my mind and a new idea will pop into my head. I’ve written down countless possibilities—many of them getting off topic and some kind of strange. But a couple things have stood out to me as the biggest pressures that college students face (maybe you’ll agree with me).

  • Pressure to Drink
  • Pressure to Do Drugs
  • Pressure to Have a Perfect Image, Perfect Health
  • Pressure to Do Well In School
  • Trying to Be Somebody You’re Not

 

Although these pressures aren’t necessarily specific to college students, the way college students deal with these issues is unique for sure. Lack of sleep, binge drinking, poor eating schedule, insane amounts of stress—dealing with this has become such a lifestyle for many of us that it may not occur the “college lifestyle” is probably not normal.   If your lifestyle isn’t normal, why should your fitness plan be? Trying to balance a crazy lifestyle with a desire to improve well-being is where I want my blog will focus.

 

2 thoughts to “Blogging about Future Blogging”

  1. “The truth is, only you know you, and only you can figure out what’s right for your schedule, and your body. The only thing I want to do with my project is to give someone that little nudge in the right direction. ”
    This point that you make really resonates with me. College students are flooded by thousands messages every day from so many sources, ranging from buzzfeed articles to the mouths of parents and friends, that few of them actually resonate with us. Furthermore, what do any of these sources really know about the individual?
    I think a way to make your argument unique is to not really frame it as an argument at all. Rather than saying “source x says ____ , source y says ____, and I say ____,” you can really engage the individual by asking him/her, “how is this important/relevant to you?” “what do you think?”

    I really like your list of the different pressures that college students face. Alongside “pressure to drink/ do drugs” you have “pressure to do well in school,” and I think that this is so on point, though often overlooked–the fact that stress can have detrimental health effects as well.

  2. Cole, it seems like you’ve come a long way since our group met up last! I think your project is not only relevant, but it’s a discussion that people are largely ignoring. I love when you articulate your new audience when you say: “My purpose remains the same in the second piece, although now my audience is not only athletes, but also the average college student that tries to stay fit…” This was the kernel that you’ve been looking for all this time, and articulating it must’ve been so satisfying. I really think that you can set your blog apart by doing small interviews with college students (who are former athletes) or surveying our class. This audience is neglected time and time again– the active people who flounder when the structure in their lives has been manipulated by the expectations of college. Both men and women struggle with this– do you plan on focusing on men?

    I also agree with Annika when she states: “I think a way to make your argument unique is to not really frame it as an argument at all. Rather than saying “source x says ____ , source y says ____, and I say ____,” you can really engage the individual by asking him/her, “how is this important/relevant to you?” “what do you think?” This can be very effective, and will eliminate any formation of a cookie-cutter research paper-like argument!

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