Chia is at the end of my Rabbit Hole

While sifting through the abundance of online library resources, I found myself back-clicking more often than not. For many of the sites, the Search Box needed to be filled in with some term the audience wanted to find; however, I wanted to continue clicking links and find an article or resource that I would have never searched on my own. After back clicking from “Business,” “Humanities,” and several other big category options, I found myself on the “Health Sciences” page. I would not consider myself a science person, yet I continuously find myself drawn to the topic. After about five clicks, without filling in the lingering Search Box, I ended on a page about chia. Chia is a food I incorporate into my diet everyday, but actually know very little about. Did you know chia was first utilized by the Aztec civilization[1]? Or, did you know that chia contains compounds (miltionone II, cryptotanshinone, tanshinone IIA) that are associated with the treatment of heart attacks and strokes[2]? In addition to facts about chia, I found an efficiency chart that lists many commonly consumed foods, or compounds, and how each affects a person’s health[3].

Generally, during my continuous clicking through search engines, I found myself drawn to webpages with clear layouts and with additional links on each page. Subsequently, I did not remain on the webpages that were disorganized and only provided additional information if the searcher filled in the Search Box. However, my actions are only relevant for this assignment. If I had a specific topic to research, there were a great deal of helpful search engines that I came across and back clicked from that would provide extremely helpful information.

[1] https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/databases/food,-herbs-supplements/c/chia/professional.aspx

[2] http://www-ncbi-nlm-nih-gov.proxy.lib.umich.edu/pubmed/15841285?dopt=Abstract

[3] https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com.proxy.lib.umich.edu/databases/comparative-effectiveness/condition-setid-30/cardiovascular-disease-prevention-atherosclerosis.aspx

Snow in Spring

It is really peculiar how we just finished our last class of Writing 220; it is almost as peculiar as when it snows in spring, like just five days ago.

Time seems to fly by in college. I don’t recall high school coming and going as quickly as college seems to be, and it is just not acceptable.

After a hopefully successful semester, I have a few tips for future gateway students:

1) Blog – It is easy to forget about blogging, especially with all the other projects going on, but it is fun! Yes, I said it. Blogging is fun. Take it in. One more time. Blogging is fun.

2) Talk to the person next to you – Your class is full of intriguing people. Get to know them. Trust me, they will make you laugh.

3) Choose an interesting topic  for Project 2 & 3 –  You will work with the same topic for an extended period of time. If you are working on something you enjoy, you’re more likely to have fun making whatever you produce, and it will be more entertaining for the audience.

4) Meet with T in office hours – T is one of those professors that actually cares about the growth of her students. Take advantage because these professors don’t come around all that often.

5) EPortfolio – Make sure your Eportfolio reflects who you are. If your name was removed from the home page, anyone in the class should be able to tell it’s your website!

Okay future MIW students….. good luck and enjoy!

It’s been a real treat T and class :).

When there’s a letter in the mailbox for you…

For project three, I am gathering opinions on the act of writing special event cards, and predominantly birthday cards. I would love to hear what you have to say :).

Please take my survey!  It literally will take you 30 seconds.

YOU ARE APPRECIATED.
YOU ARE APPRECIATED.

Recently I asked my parents to scavenge for old cards I had written them. As I sifted through the stack of cards, I noticed patterns in my writing: how I signed off, the message of the card itself, and the length of my personal message.

While reading the cards, one of two things came to mind. I either remembered how I felt when I initially wrote them, or I remember details of what I was referring to in my message. Before this mini-reminiscent session, I never fully appreciated the importance of cards to my family. And I definitely did not considered how this simple, generous act might not be the norm.

Writing letters used to be the norm. As time has passed and technological capabilities have increased, humans have become lazier. We, yes all of us, are lazy. Maybe some more so than others, but on average we are lazy human beings. It is an unfortunate, but honest truth.

 

Grammar is endless: semicolons, commas, periods, colons

I feel like an eight grader when it comes to grammar. Not to say that eight graders aren’t bright individuals, but an eight grader is not what i aspire to be.

See it makes me happy!
It kind of looks like a smiley face!

In high school, I do not remember attending a single English class devoted to grammar. I remember highlighting metaphors and similes, and deeply analyzing one paragraph of a three-hundred page book, and searching for every symbolism possible. Yet, the comma was skipped right over. I despise the comma. I really do. I envy its power, but I hates its complexity.

Comma, comma, comma. Where do I begin?

You cause fragments, hanging sentences, and just utter confusion. Maybe I am putting to much blame on the comma. Maybe it is really me who causes all of those things. Yet, I still hate you comma. I cannot get a grasp on the right and wrong time to use you. I do not want abuse you in my papers, but I do not want to neglect you either. I am still trying to find that happy medium. Each time I write, comma is the punctuation that trips me up.

The colon on the other hand is a beautiful thing: simple, distinct and pretty. Two dots. One dot atop the another. Beautiful. I enjoy using colons because I am confident when I do. Inserting the symbol into my words just feels oh so right. I particularly enjoy using a colon right before a list. It flows and looks neat and nice.

The one thing about grammar that I both despise and enjoy is its ability to never stop challenging me. I hate feeling like an eighth grader, but I love feeling like there is more to learn.

Get at me grammar.

2014: How far we have come… yet, how much we have lost.

How can you not get this card?
How can you not get this card?

Recently I asked my parents to scavenge up old cards I had written them – an easy task for any member of my family. As I sifted through the stack of cards, many thoughts came to my mind. I noticed patterns in my writing, how I signed off, the message of the card itself, and the length of my personal message.

Interestingly, while reading the cards one of two things occurred: I either remembered how I felt when I initially wrote them, or I remember details of what I was referring to in my message. Before this mini-reminiscent session I never fully appreciated the importance of cards to my family. And I definitely did not considered how this simple, generous act might not be the norm.

Writing letters used to be the norm. As time has passed and technological capabilities have increased, humans have become lazier. We, yes all of us, are lazy. Maybe some more so than others, but on average we are lazy human beings. It is an unfortunate, but honest truth.

Every birthday I save the cards I receive because the words mean something to me. I do not think my birthday would be as special if the cards did not come in the mail. It is the one day a year when I actually receive letters in the mail … besides the other “special event” holidays, of course.

Special events, like birthdays or Father’s Day, provide people with an opportunity to express their gratitude. Often people assume their loved ones know they are loved. But it doesn’t hurt to ensure this assumption because it may not be true.

My mother knows I love her dearly. Yet, I do not say it nearly as many times as I should. The cards are where I, and you, have the chance to express emotions. We give our words life by putting the on paper. They no longer live in our minds; they now live on a tangible object that can be cherished for hundreds of years. Literally.

On birthdays and holidays my father displays all the cards on the dining room table. It is refreshing to be reading a hand-written card, and not a typed up article online. Writing cards makes it real.

Please never send an E-card. They are so impersonal, and a little tacky if we are continuing with the honesty trend. Forget technology for ten minutes, take a piece of paper and pen, and write.

It is 2014, but the ink has not run out. Start now.

If it’s stolen, is it genuine?

For Project II I am writing a blog post about “special event” cards. Recently it has come to my attention that not everyone writes their loved ones cards. This is a strange concept to me. Every single birthday and every single mothers/fathers day I find myself writing a card. Okay fine. Sometimes I skip out on my siblings birthday. But that is only because they care more about the presents.

While searching the web for a place to post my blog, I found an interesting website. It is a site dedicated to helping people write cards. The website provides people with word for word sentences to put into cards. While reading the suggested sentences three thoughts crossed my mind:

1) I cannot believe there is a website for this

2) AWKWARD! I use half of these sentences/phrases

3) Is a person’s card genuine if they found their sentences online?

 

Finding this article reinforced my revelation about writing “special events” cards. Not only do people not do it, but the people who do cannot necessarily do it alone.

Who writes cards to loved ones? Who uses websites for inspiration and help?

A little help from my friend.
A little help from my friend.

Something called a fast metabolism

 

My valentine
My valentine

People with a fast metabolism,

if you lost that gene you’d wish for an atavism.

As Valentine’s Day approaches,

the chocolate on the Walgreen’s shelves encroaches.

I just want to buy shampoo,

but the chocolate makes me cry boohoo.

If I had a fast metabolism I would eat everything I see,

I would eat like a cow and feel oh so free.

Chocolate on chocolate on chocolate,

I could eat it until my jeans did not fit.

Friday I will go to dinner with friends,

if I treat myself dessert depends.

I hate you, I hate you, and I hate you.

But chocolate, if I could, I would date you.

—————————————————-

Roses are red,

violets are blue.

I wish I could be a cow,

that constantly bellows moo.

A thinker’s manifesto.

Write to share your thoughts. Thoughts

are POWERFUL and deserve to be analyzed not just by the thinker,

but by ALL THINKERS.

Write because it can brighten your day, and if not

your someone else’s.

Writing makes you feel like a child PLAYing at the beach, except now,

instead of mashing together grains of sand to build a work of art,

you MASH together words.

poster_ENG_web
If you look closely, you will see manifestos everywhere.

The Critically Acclaimed Dog-Lover

Zoe Zaiss is a critically acclaimed dog-lover. She was the recipient of the 2012 Herff Jones Principal’s Leadership Award, which was granted to one student in her graduating class.  But more importantly, she is the owner of four lovable pooches. Growing up as the youngest of five, Zoe has always been an avid talker. She now looks to the MIW to help her eloquently transfer those words onto paper. Oh, and she’s from New York.

My Main Men.
My Main Men.